Forum :: 7th Expert Forum on Farm Animal Well-being

7th Expert Forum on Farm Animal Well-being, Madrid (Spain), 2014

7th Expert Forum on Farm Animal Well-being

Pain was listed as a top concern for cow welfare by veterinarians across nations – whether caused by lameness, mastitis or other disease. This came out of the animated group discussions led by farm animal welfare specialists Nina von Keyserlingk and Daniel Weary (University of British Columbia, Canada) during the Boehringer Ingelheim Expert Forum on Farm Animal Well-being, held in Madrid on 13 June. Stress and behavioural restriction, whether due to inadequate housing, overstocking or management, were also listed as high priority concerns.
Veterinarians should take the lead in raising awareness and education, participants suggested. The identification of so-called “win-win” situations – on-farm welfare problems that could be easily improved and that would lead to increased productivity – were mentioned as a way to convince farmers. The theme of this year’s Forum, attended by over 70 practitioners from 18 countries, was ‘Pain and stress around parturition: the impact on mothers and their offspring’.

LECTURES

Prof. Marina A. G. von Keyserlingk and Prof. Daniel M. Weary

Knowledge and perceptions of cattle welfare among animal health professionals

Prof. Marina A. G. von Keyserlingk and Prof. Daniel M. Weary

University of British Columbia, Canada

This workshop will allow you to share your views on the most important welfare challenges on farms today, and how these values align with those of farmers and the general public. Dan and Nina will guide the discussion on core values about animal welfare and what you think are the knowledge gaps and barriers to change. In preparation for the workshop participants will complete an online survey before attending the Forum. Results from the online survey and a summary of the discussions will be presented in the afternoon of the conference.

Dr. Kenny Rutherford

How stress during pregnancy affects the offspring

Dr. Kenny Rutherford

SRUC, Edinburgh, UK

Cows spend a large proportion of their post-pubertal life pregnant and many of the factors that are known to affect cow welfare have potential to alter developing fetal offspring with consequences for their postnatal life.

Prof. Patricia Lavand’homme

Long term effects of painful childbirth in women

Prof. Patricia Lavand’homme

University Catholic of Louvain, Brussels, Belgium

The development of safe and efficacious analgesic techniques as well as the social acceptance have permitted considerable progress in obstetric anaesthesia. The immediate benefits of analgesia not only concern maternal comfort but also foetal wellbeing. Recently, new concerns have emerged regarding long term effects of pain during labour.

Dr. Richard Laven

Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs around calving can maximize productivity and fertility

Dr. Richard Laven

Massey University, New Zealand

NSAID’s could be expected to have significant effects in the post-calving period. The lack of published data supports the contention that NSAIDs are likely to be under-used and sub-optimally prescribed in the post-calving period.

Dr. Marie Haskell

The impact of dystocia on dairy calf health, welfare, performance and survival

Dr. Marie Haskell

SRUC, Edinburgh, UK

It is well-documented that dystocia is associated with higher mortality in the immediate post-natal period. The growth, survival, health and welfare of the calf may also be adversely affected.

PROCEEDINGS

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ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTS

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